Monthly Archives: March 2019

 

March 5, 2019

Comments Off on Luke Foley promises Labor would add 500 paramedics

Luke Foley promises Labor would add 500 paramedics

More paramedics: Labor would add 500 more staff over four years. Photo: Amy CorderoyAn additional 500 paramedics would be hired over the next four years under a Labor election policy announced on Sunday.
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Paramedics say the 15 per cent increase in staff over four years will stop dangerous work practices that currently exist in overstretched ambulance stations, where paramedics are sometimes forced to work long hours without days off, and sometimes to attend jobs alone.

Labor leader Luke Foley said the system was overstretched, and the additional resources, which would be gradually rolled out with 125 new positions each year, would help them focus on saving lives.

“Paramedics are one of the most trusted professions in our communities – their arrival at our homes, workplaces and everywhere in-between can literally be the difference between life and death,” he said. “This is about increasing response times, increasing and improving patient care.”

He said the policy would cost $46.6 million over two years, along with $2.1 million for capital costs including 76 additional ambulances and extra equipment such as defibrillators and stretchers.

Steven Fraser, an intensive are paramedic from the mid-north coast, said the new positions were needed and would allow paramedics to treat patients more quickly.

“In our job, time matters, minute matters, and what we want and … what we are getting here is more resources to make those minutes less,” he said. “In order to do the job you have to have the people there, it can’t be done remotely”.

Labor says ambulance response times have increased under the Liberal government to an average of 10.8 minutes last financial year – above a national benchmark of 10 minutes.

The NSW Ambulance service website, which breaks down data by subgroup rather than overall average response time, shows the average daytime response time in the Sydney area decreased over the past three years. However, response times in other parts of NSW and at night have blown out.

Labor’s health spokesman Walt Secord said Labor intended to target the new ambulance positions to areas of need, with half in Sydney and half in rural areas.

He said Labor was also promising more hospital beds in Westmead, the Tweed and St George, which would held prevent “trolley block”, where ambulances were stuck at hospitals unable to offload patients at busy emergency rooms.

“Many paramedics have expressed to us the frustration of getting people to hospital only to find out there’s a shortage of beds,” he said.

In January Fairfax Media revealed patients and paramedics had been kept waiting up to 20 hours in Blacktown Hospital because of bed closures.

Gerard Hayes, the NSW secretary of the Health Services Union, said he hoped the Liberal government would match the promise.

“We have seen over the last three years increases in call-outs that go to 30,000 [extra] a year, and paramedics can’t meet that gap without these resources,” he said.

The Labor policy says there are currently 3435 paramedics, who attend more than one million cases each year.

“Roster vacancies are often unfilled and there are also reports of paramedics being forced to respond to call-outs by themselves,” it says. “This is an unsafe practice for both paramedic and patient”.

The Baird government has committed $150 million to roll-out five new “super” ambulance stations at Kogarah, Bankstown, Blacktown, Liverpool and Penrith, a plan the Labor party said it will also back.

Your seat by seat guide to the NSW election:

<a href="/interactive/2015/nsw-election/electorates/electorates.html?el=Auburn" _rte_href="/interactive/2015/nsw-election/electorates/electorates.html?el=Auburn">Key facts on NSW electorates</a>

 

March 5, 2019

Comments Off on THEATRE: Mr Bennet’s Bride goes on tour

THEATRE: Mr Bennet’s Bride goes on tour

REPRISED: Cassandra Griffin, James Chapman, Lance Hawkins and Tracey Gordon are among the cast taking Mr Bennet’s Bride on the road. Picture: Simone De PeakWHEN Newcastle Theatre Company staged the premiere last year of member Emma Wood’s Mr Bennet’s Bride, a prequel to Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, they wondered what the audience response would be.
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Austen’s novel centring on the five Bennet sisters, with the two oldest being of an age where they are expected to marry, has been popular with readers since it was published 200 years ago, and the film and television adaptations have been audience favourites.

In Mr Bennet’s Bride, Emma Wood draws on references in the novel to the backgrounds of the girls’ ill-matched parents to show how they came together 25 years earlier.

As things turned out, Mr Bennet’s Bride was a hit with theatregoers.

The show became the third biggest audience draw in the company’s 57-year history, selling 98 per cent of seats in its three-week run. Some audience members enjoyed it so much that they returned for a second viewing.

Word about the play spread beyond Newcastle, with the organisers of Canberra’s annual Jane Austen Festival asking if the NTC production could be staged as part of their 2015 event.

So Mr Bennet’s Bride will have three performances at Canberra’s Repertory Theatre on Saturday and Sunday, April 11 and 12.

The following Saturday, April 18, there will be two shows in Sydney, at Chatswood’s Zenith Theatre.

Novocastrians haven’t been forgotten. NTC will host three stagings at its Lambton theatre on Easter weekend, with matinee and evening shows on Saturday, April 4, and a matinee on Sunday, April 5.

And Emma Wood, who is now living in Canberra, has received other good news about the play in the past week.

Sydney-based David Spicer Productions, a theatrical agency that represents predominantly Australian works, is now publishing plays through new subsidiary DSPress.

Mr Bennet’s Bride is the first play offered in book form.

The NTC production, again being rehearsed by director Julie Black, has new cast members playing four of the 10 characters, as some of the original actors had other commitments.

James Chapman has joined the cast in the role of James, the Mr Bennet of the play’s title.

James is 28 and trying to ignore his father’s demand that he get married almost immediately.

The widowed father, Robert, is worried that if James, his only child, doesn’t marry and produce an heir, their vast rural estate will fall into the hands of a greedy cousin who has just become father to a son.

While James doesn’t get along with dad, he’s grateful for the advice and support his father’s live-in sister, Mary, gives him.

Tracey Gordon, who played Mary last year, has returned to the role and she is enjoying it as much as the first time. She also sees the inclusion of four new cast members as giving the storytelling freshness.

Chapman auditioned for the role of James before the play’s first staging, and he’s excited to now have the chance to play the initially grumpy loner who is attracted to a young woman whose parents see him as a good catch.

Other returning actors are Lance Hawkins as Robert, Cassandra Griffin as Emily Gardiner, the 17-year-old who catches the eye of James, Malcolm Young as the avaricious cousin, Benedict Collins, Stephanie McDonald as another would-be bride, Clara Bowman, and Alison Murphy as Clara’s mother.

Other newcomers are Patrick Campbell and Fran Hodgson, as Emily’s scheming parents, and Jenny Brook, as the observant housekeeper.

Mr Bennet’s Bride can be seen at the NTC Theatre, 90 De Vitre Street, Lambton, on Saturday, April 4, at 2pm and 8pm, and on Sunday, April 5, at 2pm. Tickets: $29, concession $23. Bookings: 49524958; newcastletheatrecompany上海龙凤419m.au.

 

March 5, 2019

Comments Off on Eagles give one of these nights to remember

Eagles give one of these nights to remember

Eagles give one of these nights to remember LEGENDS: The Eagles, from left, Timothy B. Schmit, Bernie Leadon, Glenn Frey and Joe Walsh perform at Hope Estate, Pokolbin. Picture: Dean Osland
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Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

Scenes from the Eagles concert at Hope Estate on Saturday, March 7, 2015. Picture: Dean Osland.

TweetFacebookHUNTER audiences were treated to a performance from one of the world’s most revered bands, when The Eagles took to the stage at Hope Estate.

Band members Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Joe Walsh and Timothy B. Schmit played in Pokolbin on Saturday as part of their History of The Eagles world tour, which began in 2013 to coincide with the release of a documentary of the same name and has been suggested as possibly their last.

The three-hour show spanning the band’s entire career saw them play songs they had not previously performed live, as well as celebrated favourites such as Desperado, Take It Easy, Lyin’ Eyes and Take It To The Limit.

Formed in Los Angeles in 1971, The Eagles are one of the world’s best-selling bands of all time, having sold more than 150 million records.

 

March 5, 2019

Comments Off on Back from the brink: how to lose 207kg

Back from the brink: how to lose 207kg

TRANSFORMER: The transformation of Jordan Tirekidis who lost more than 200 kilograms.Source: South Coast Register
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JORDAN Tirekidis lost 207 kilograms and with it the title of Australia’s fattest man.

He had a severe food addiction that was killing him and about three years ago decided to turn his life around.

On a bad day Mr Tirekidis would eat up to 20 hash browns and four coffees for breakfast, four to eight burgers with fries and several colas for lunch. Afternoon tea was often 16 cakes. On the way home after a family dinner he would consume four Hungry Jack meal deals followed by a late night snack of two family pizzas, a large cola and a dozen ice-creams.

Mr Tirekidis’ journey from being a morbidly obese 310 kilograms has resulted in him having a strong connection to the Shoalhaven on the New South Wales South Coast.

Mr Tirekidis is a Sydney resident but lived in the Shoalhaven while on his weight-loss journey.

He spent a lot of time with Nowra personal trainer Ivan Murray and hypnosis weight-loss specialist Mark Stephens from Milton.

Mr Stephens said discovering why Mr Tirekidis would eat as many as 13 burgers or 12 family blocks of chocolate in a single binge was crucial to helping him overcome his addiction.

“Food had become an anaesthetic for Jordan and getting to the underlying problems took time,” Mr Stephens said.

Mr Murray remembers their first exercise session.

“We started with 15-metre walks. His first session on a cross-trainer machine lasted 30 seconds,” Mr Murray said.

“We had to take it easy. We didn’t want Jordan getting hurt either by too much movement too fast or by breaking any machinery.

“It was pretty scary. He had a journey and a half ahead of him.”

Now with two thirds of his body weight gone, Mr Tirekidis is a new person and wants to help others get fit and healthy.

Mr Stephens documented the steps taken to help Mr Tirekidis shed more than 200 kilograms in a book titled, the Think Slim Diet.

The book will be launched in Nowra on Tuesday, March 17 at the Bomaderry Bowling Club from 6pm.

 

March 5, 2019

Comments Off on Qantas 747-400 VH-OJA lands at Illawarra Regional Airport

Qantas 747-400 VH-OJA lands at Illawarra Regional Airport

Qantas Jumbo 747 lands at Illawarra Regional Airport | Photos The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR
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The Qantas 747 Jumbo making it’s way over Wollongong towards its final home at the HARS facility in Albion Park Rail. Picture: ROBERT PEET

The Qantas 747 Jumbo making it’s way over Wollongong towards its final home at the HARS facility in Albion Park Rail. Picture: ROBERT PEET

The Qantas 747 Jumbo making it’s way over Wollongong towards its final home at the HARS facility in Albion Park Rail. Picture: ROBERT PEET

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

A photographer waits for the the Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra to make its final approach in a Yallah paddock north of the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

Thousands of people were on hand to watch the Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrive at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: ORLANDO CHIODO

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: ORLANDO CHIODO

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: ORLANDO CHIODO

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: ORLANDO CHIODO

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: ORLANDO CHIODO

Thousands of people were on hand to watch the Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrive at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: ORLANDO CHIODO

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra on final approach north of the Illawarra Regional airport. Picture: KIRK GILMOUR

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: ANDY ZAKELI

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra is parked at its final home at the HARS complex at the Illawarra Regional airport at Albion Park Rail. Picture: KIKR GILMOUR

Thousands of people were on hand to watch the Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrive at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: ORLANDO CHIODO

Thousands of people were on hand to watch the Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrive at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: ORLANDO CHIODO

Thousands of people were on hand to watch the Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrive at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: ORLANDO CHIODO

Thousands of people were on hand to watch the Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrive at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Thousands of people were on hand to watch the Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrive at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Thousands of people were on hand to watch the Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrive at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Captain Greg Matthews departs the 747-400. Photo SYLVIA LIBER

Captain Greg Matthews hand over the keys to Qantas 747-400 to HARS president Bob De La Hunty

Pilots and former Pilots Michael East, Ossie Miller, David Massey-Greene, Rob Greenop , Ray Heiniger, Peter Hagley and Ossie Miller.Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Graeme Boyd at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Graham Smith and Kim Kinninmont at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Ezekeil Curnow, 8 at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

Neil Tazewell who worked for Qantas for 42 years seen at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN

The Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrives at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: SYLVIA LIBER

An extremely delighted fan is happy to see the Qantas 747 Jumbo the City of Canberra arrive at the Illawarra Regional Airport. Picture: CHRISTOPHER CHAN

TweetFacebookA STUNNING Autumn morning and thousands of spectators welcomed the Qantas VH-OJA to its new home at the Illawarra Regional Airport on Sunday.

The record breaking 747-400, known as the City of Canberra, is being donated to the Historic Aircraft Restoration Society.

Captain Greg Matthews – the pilot in command on the 15 minute flight from Mascot to the Albion Park Rail – said the flight and landing at the small airport went according to plan.

‘‘All the plans we put in place to make this landing as routinely as possible all worked very well for us,’’ Captain Matthews said.

The aircraft touched down at the Illawarra Regional Airport ‘‘just after’’ 7.47am.

‘‘Conditions in Sydney were fine, it was a beautiful night in Sydney last night and I was glad to hear there were blue skies and calm winds in the Illawarra,’’ Captain Matthews said.

‘‘There were a few delays leaving Sydney, but we did our best to make good that arrival time.’’

Captain Matthews said the flight was ‘‘a bit sentimental’’

‘‘But we know the aircraft will be well maintained by HARS and we know it will be looked after as a great tourist attraction.’’

One of four pilots charged with delivering the Qantas 747-400 to the Illawarra Regional Airport on Sunday morning was Michael East.

The last time the former University of Wollongong student touched down at the Illawarra Regional Airport it was behind the controls of a single-engine four-seater.

On Sunday morning he was on a 400 seat aircraft – albeit 400 empty passenger seats.

‘‘The flight this morning went off perfectly, it was beautiful day and I am elated and thrilled to be part of it,’’ the second officer said.‘‘It was perfect conditions, few clouds and a light breeze.

‘‘Coming out of Sydney we had the fire trucks give us a water cannon salute and that was spectacular and coming down the coast it was beautiful.‘‘We were blown away so many people came out to see it.

‘‘On approach there were thousands of people lining the runway with cameras flashing away … it was a very special moment.

‘‘HARS is fitting place for the aircraft to spend it is life, it is a historic aircraft.

‘‘It will be on for display generations to come and will be a great tourist attraction.’’The 34-year-old said after months of planning it is back to regular duties this week.

‘‘Tokyo this week is my next adventure,’’ he said.

‘‘This has been going on for a few months, Qantas has hundreds of people working on this in all different departments so a huge thank you goes out to them.

‘‘A lot of work has gone into making this happen today.’’

Source: Illawarra Mercury